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It is best for Nintendo to leave Tears of the Kingdom behind

Eiji Aonuma confirmed in a recent interview with Famitsu that The Legend of Zelda: Tears of the Kingdom will not be receiving any downloadable content...

Patrick Smith Sept 08, 2023
It is best for Nintendo to leave Tears of the Kingdom behind

Eiji Aonuma confirmed in a recent interview with Famitsu that The Legend of Zelda: Tears of the Kingdom will not be receiving any downloadable content, and the team at Nintendo will now be turning their attention to a new game within the fictional universe.

Years after its release in 2017, Breath of the Wild was supplemented with an expansion and additional bonuses. Therefore, I imagined that fans were also hoping for a similar treatment for its highly acclaimed and experimental sequel. However, Aonuma has shattered our hopes in the best possible way as he looks towards the future.

For those who may not know, Tears of the Kingdom originally began as another expansion for its predecessor before it became apparent that Nintendo had too many narrative and mechanical ideas. As a result, all of these ideas were incorporated into the sequel, which arrived at the beginning of this year.

Nintendo Leaving Tears of The Kingdom Behind Is For The Best

The result was a more confident and diverse game that many consider to be the ultimate embodiment of the original ideas presented in Breath of the Wild. It preserves the cherished sense of freedom while introducing new gameplay elements that allow players to create almost anything and venture nearly anywhere. I praised it in my review and even after hundreds of hours, I continue to discover new things within it. It is a masterpiece, but we understand that the time will come to move forward and accept that the series should now embark on a new direction.

Aonuma does not completely rule out a return to the vision of Hyrule as seen in previous installments. However, for the moment, he and his team have done everything to derive enjoyment from the various locations and characters. As much as I adore Breath of the Wild and Tears of the Kingdom, and as certain as I am that I will revisit these games over the years, one of the reasons I love Zelda so profoundly is that it never fears reinventing itself.

Nintendo Leaving Tears of The Kingdom Behind Is For The

It is this adaptable, ever-evolving identity that has kept the franchise so relevant and is precisely why, even decades later, millions of us still flock to each new game. Nintendo is also not known for settling. When it comes to the Hero of Time, the company strives to challenge itself and build upon what has been previously created, rather than constantly dredging up the past for easy successes. That's not the kind of Zelda game I ever want to see, and I doubt we will ever see it, especially with developers like Aonuma at the helm who know when to push forward and when to pull back.

Long before its release, Tears of the Kingdom was already being compared to Majora's Mask. This game utilizes many of the same visuals and mechanics as Ocarina of Time, but in tone and narrative, it couldn't be more different. It is dark and foreboding, unafraid to tell heart-wrenching stories and depict our hero as truly helpless. It was also developed in a very short period of time, and if this production hadn't been so streamlined and breathtakingly swift, I doubt something so remarkable would have been possible at all.

Nintendo Leaving Tears of The Kingdom Behind Is For

Wind Waker wouldn't have been possible if Nintendo had been afraid of taking risks or concerned about what its longtime fans might think. Twilight Princess was the only installment across multiple generations that truly felt safe. Yes, precisely the one in which Link transforms into a wolf was considered the safe part.

Everything else has built upon what was previously created, experiencing both mistakes and triumphs, ultimately culminating in the groundbreaking brilliance of Breath of the Wild and Tears of the Kingdom, which has likely redefined Zelda forever. Where it goes from here is unknown, but isn't that precisely what makes it so exciting?