The initially malevolent narrator of Baldur's Gate 3 would have captured the D&D experience perfectly | GAME3A
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The initially malevolent narrator of Baldur's Gate 3 would have captured the D&D experience perfectly

The narrator of Baldur's Gate 3, Amelia Tyler, recently shared with our own Jade King in an interview that her initial portrayal of the narrator was s...

Levi Winslow Sept 06, 2023
The initially malevolent narrator of Baldur's Gate 3 would have captured the D&D experience perfectly

The narrator of Baldur's Gate 3, Amelia Tyler, recently shared with our own Jade King in an interview that her initial portrayal of the narrator was significantly more malevolent. Tyler's voice accompanies you on your journey and guides you through every roll, be it a success or a failure. She serves as an impartial observer, providing commentary on your actions as they unfold, for the most part at least. However, this was not the original vision - Tyler described the previous narrator as someone who "delighted in witnessing your failures," drawing inspiration from Scar in The Lion King.

Unfortunately, this was removed during the Early Access phase and replaced with a gentler game master who felt less like "another person challenging the player" and more like "a voice in their head, present throughout their entire life," one who "fully supports all the decisions they make." That is, until you roll a critical misstep - for that, you will still be roasted.

I can comprehend why the developers took a different direction - Tyler states that it would have been "exhausting" for players over an extended campaign, and I agree with that assessment. Spending 100 hours in a game and being relentlessly harassed by the narrator could quickly become tiresome, especially for those who aim to complete the game swiftly through brute force. While some of us may enjoy being subjected to mockery, the vast majority of individuals will likely find it annoying after hours of play each day for weeks on end.

Baldur’s Gate 3

Nevertheless, I would have wished to have had the opportunity to experience the game with that narrator. It's quite rare for me to immerse myself in games that are still in Early Access, as I prefer a more polished gaming experience. However, I have friends who have been playing Baldur's Gate 3 for years and have sunk hundreds of hours into Act 1 alone. These individuals, who had a direct influence on shaping the game into what it is today, have experienced Tyler's initial interpretation of the BG3 narrator and the full experience of the "malevolent game master who delights in witnessing your failures."

In my experience, it would align more closely, but hopefully not with everyone's experience. When I play Dungeons & Dragons with one of my closest longtime friends as the game master, I hear wicked laughter every time I roll a die, whether it's a success or a failure. There's generally a lot of mockery involved. "You're going to fail again," they might say as I hold a d20 between my sweaty palms, followed by cheerful laughter when I actually do fail. If I roll a critical misstep, which happens often because I have a lot of bad luck, they might triumphantly declare, "You're screwed!" When I succeed, I receive a reluctant "Well, you did it... this time." My game master takes pleasure in my suffering, just like the original narrator of Baldur's Gate 3.

Baldur’s Gate 3

One might think that I would grow weary of it, but somehow I love it. Probably not for 100 hours, but still, I wish I had the opportunity to experience it during the Early Access of Baldur's Gate 3. Unfortunately, there's no way for me to travel back in time and be relentlessly teased for my failures, but I can still simply go to my friend's house and have that experience with D&D there.